Truths About Christian HomeschoolingWhether this is your first or tenth year of homeschooling, you hear both the lies and truths about Christian homeschooling that are verified or contradicted as you experience your own unique homeschool adventures.

Homeschool Lies

“Your children must never get out of the house.” Field trips. Youth groups. Co-ops. Sleepovers. Birthday parties with the neighborhood kids. Fill in the blank: _____. The idea that homeschooled children don’t get out of the house is a lie that becomes apparent as you juggle daily homeschool activities. You and your children are constantly finding new ways to get out of the house and incorporate your children’s passion into activities. Your children are not antisocial, even if they do enjoy reading a book in the treehouse or studying a long line of ants. Read about the journey of a homeschooler who asks herself, “Am I socialized yet?

“You must get annoyed being with your kids all the time.” Any homeschool mom will admit that yes, some days kids try your patience to no end, but this phrase is a truth that morphs into a homeschool lie because having the opportunity to teach your child in every situation is priceless. Homeschooling provides moments to teach your children about emotional, physical, mental, educational, religious, and social issues as you live and celebrate each moment with them. If anything, your love for your children grows stronger because you experience each high and low with them and learn to love every aspect of the unique individual God created.

Homeschool Truths

“Homeschooling is hard.” On Pinterest, blogs, and television, homeschooling can be depicted as a walk in the park. Kids complete assignments on their own, there are no educational setbacks, and temper tantrums are rare occurrences. In real-life, Christian homeschooling is difficult and full of moments when you wonder, “Can I do this?” The kids don’t understand a concept that you barely understand. Your children are not making friends in the new co-op. The world is telling you that homeschooling is detrimental to your kids’ social life. Yet, like many difficulties in life, you have to walk through the fire to get to the treasure. Romans 12:12 says, “Rejoicing in hope; patient in tribulation; continuing instant in prayer.”

“Homeschooling is worth it.” It’s true, homeschooling is hard. It takes patience. It takes a lot of hard work. Yet, homeschooling is worth it because in its own special way, homeschooling works for the kids, the moms, and the dads. Children learn from their siblings and parents. You can teach your children to love and live for God in all they do. They, in turn, can become better learners and communicators. Children excel in studying what they are interested in at their own pace. You can homeschool because it is worth it. Deuteronomy 6:6-7 says, “And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.”

The question, “What is one ‘truth’ about homeschooling that you didn’t realize until you started homeschooling?” was asked on Alpha Omega Publications Switched-On Schoolhouse’s Facebook page on July 22, 2013. A few of the responses from homeschoolers include the following:

• “I didn’t realize how much I would learn in the process!”
• “That being scared to homeschool would change to such a strong passion to homeschool all the way through.”
• “I can do this.”
• “That my kids would expect me to teach them in all areas of life - even outside the classroom and after school hours. They just know I'm the mom and I'm the one who's going to teach them about life.”
• “I didn't realize my kids really would stay in their pajamas all day! But more importantly that I could work full time outside the home and still educate my kids.”

What do you think? What is a lie or truth about Christian homeschooling?