So it's happened again. Your older child has left coloring books and crayons out on the table after homeschooling and your younger child has found them to create "masterpieces" throughout the house. No need to lose your cool. Try these simple remedies to repair the damage and have your homeschool looking like new again:

Walls — Hands down, the best way to remove crayon marks effortlessly is with the multipurpose lubricant, WD-40®. Simply spray a small amount (just enough to cover the marks) and wipe clean with a dry, soft cotton rag. (You may want to test a small area first to make sure your paint will not spot or fade.) If a small mark remains, repeat the application 30 seconds later and wipe again. Use a damp sponge with hot water and dish detergent to wipe away any product left behind and no one will ever know where your little "Picasso" painted his picture.

No WD-40 in the house? No problem. Grab a clean baby wipe or a laundry dryer sheet and give the wall a good scrub until the markings disappear. Clean any residual product left behind with a damp cloth or sponge. You can also try removing crayon marks with lighter fluid (avoiding areas with an open flame, of course) or non-stick cooking spray. As before, test a small area first and then spray, rub, and wipe. Wipe remaining product off with a clean, damp cloth.

Not interested in using a chemical cleaner? These methods should do the trick. Erase the crayon marks with a pencil eraser or use a damp rag dipped in baking soda and lightly scrub the mark.

On flat walls, you can also use a piece of waxed paper or paper towel and an iron set on the lowest setting or a hot hair dryer. Place the waxed paper or paper towel over the markings and the heat from the iron or hair dryer should melt the crayon wax and lift the mark off the wall onto the paper.

Wallpaper — Lightly skim the surface of the wallpaper with a steel wool soap pad in one direction to remove the crayon mark.

Hardwood floors — Fill a plastic bag with ice and place over the crayon mark. When frozen, simply remove the mark by scraping the floor with a terry cloth rag.

Vinyl floors — Rub silver polish into the crayon mark and wipe away with a soft, cotton cloth.

Carpet — Scrape as much of the crayon mark off as possible by gently pulling straight up on the carpet fibers with a clean, dry cloth — don't rub. Then apply WD-40 sparingly (test to see if it will spot the carpet first) and use the same process to remove the remaining marks.

Wood furniture — Apply mayonnaise to the crayon marks and let soak for a few minutes. Wipe the surface clean with a damp cloth.

Clothing — Apply undiluted apple cider vinegar directly on crayon marks using an old toothbrush and then wash as normal.

You can also remove crayon marks from clothing using a combination of WD-40 and dishwashing soap. Place several paper towels under the fabric and then rub both sides of the stain with a clean soft rag sprayed with WD-40. (You may need to apply WD-40 directly to fabric if the crayon mark is deep.) Then rub a small amount of dishwashing liquid into the crayon mark and wait a few minutes for the paper towel to absorb the crayon mark. Replace with fresh paper towels as needed. Wash on hottest water setting possible. Before drying, inspect your garment and repeat entire process if needed.

Inside clothes dryer — Miss a crayon hiding in your child's pocket before washing and drying the clothes? No need to worry. Apply WD-40 onto a clean, damp rag and wipe off the melted crayon from the dryer drum using lots of elbow grease. (Be careful not to spray the solution directly into the dryer.) Before drying your regular laundry, dry old rags inside the dryer first to ensure the crayon marks are removed.

Knowing how to remove crayon marks from various surfaces is important for any homeschooling family with young children. Prevention is the best key in solving your crayon mark problems, but accidents do happen. However, with these easy-to-do remedies, removing crayon marks doesn't have to be the end of the world.

WD-40 is a registered trademark of WD-40 Manufacturing Company.