Homeschool parents are opting for more creative ways to keep their students engaged in learning. More families are blending their teaching methods with new, outside resources, a method known as hybrid homeschooling.  

“Historically homeschool was homeschool, and school was school,” said Joseph Murphy, author of Home Schooling in America: Capturing and Assessing the Movement. “Now … it’s this rich portfolio of options for kids.”

Education Week reports that hybrid homeschooling is growing, and more families are forgoing a standard school day routine. In its place, homeschool parents are incorporating co-op classes, online courses, private tutors, and even public school classes into their students’ schedules. For example, a hybrid homeschooler may take graphic design at a college, math at a local school, an online business course, and study English at home.

The downfall is that while hybrid homeschooling offers students more options, it requires parents to give away some control and decision-making power over their children’s education to other teachers. Yet another drawback is that some states may categorize a student who studies at a college, local school, and an online academy a full-time public school student instead of a homeschooler.

Hybrid homeschooling programs present an alternative option for homeschool families. Similar to a part-time school, these programs map out the individual education of each student with insight from parents, and then provide the academic instruction. Several national companies perform this task for families who need help creating a mix of home and classroom education.

About half of state legislatures now require school districts to allow homeschooled students to enroll part time if they want to, noted Education Week. This allows school districts to give equal access to homeschool families who pay taxes that benefit the districts and whose children generate additional revenue that schools receive per student.

What’s your take on hybrid homeschooling?